Follow



Subscribe

Get email updates about new entries:



Twitter


What is SpyParty?

SpyParty is a spy game about human behavior, performance, perception, and deception. While most espionage games have you spend your time shooting stuff, blowing stuff up, and driving fast, SpyParty has you hide in plain sight, deceive your opponent, and detect subtle behavioral tells to achieve your objectives.



Category Archives: esports

Summer Cup 2019 – Group Stage Results

The group stages of the largest Summer Cup yet are just about wrapped up. Let’s take a look at who made it out of groups, how, and what their prospects look like going forward.


Group A


Predictions for Group A seemed to be relatively straightforward for most: virifaux would be the winner of the group, while the rest of the group battles it out for second. Though viri did win the group, and Harren came in second past Tflameee and BasiQ, the individual matches didn’t come out the way most expected. viri bled at the hands of Tflameee, and only took first in the group of the strength of tiebreakers. Unfortunately, Tflameee’s 1-1-1 record was not enough to advance, due to their draw against BasiQ, who gained their only point during that match.

Continue reading

Threat vs. Suspicion

There are two ways that snipers get highlights and lowlights:

  1. They highlight characters for potentially completing missions. These suspects are Threatening to win the game via mission completion. A partygoer has reached 100% threat if they could have completed the number of required missions.
  2. They highlight characters for acting Suspiciously. Snipers may feel something is suspicious because it looks “non-AI like” or “human-like” or “Like something my opponent would do.”

Note that what is Suspicious varies wildly from sniper to sniper, but what is Threatening is always the same.

Continue reading

Shark Week(end) – Full Results

Day 1: Round Robin

Roughly two dozen people showed up to compete in Shark Week(end), a weekend-long mini-tournament to test and explore the game’s newest venue, Aquarium. The new venue’s most notable feature is a massive shark that swims back and forth between the sniper and the party, creating temporary (but significant, and predictable) occlusion.

Given the uptick in participation from the Teien tournament in December, the proceedings on the first day lasted roughly three-and-a-half-hours, and not everyone completed every match. Most players played 42 games. The top four slots were as follows:
Continue reading

Game Finder 2.0 Released

We’ve just released a new, dramatically improved version of the SCL Game Finder.

Game Finder 1.0 allowed you to search for any player, in any role, with any outcome, within a specific division and on a specific venue, for the previous two regular seasons. Version 2.0 is a massive leap forward in both available information and options.
Continue reading

Teien Tournament – Full Results

Day 1: Round Robin

The first day of the Teien Tournament was a round robin featuring 17 competitors. Each player was scheduled to play every other player for two games: one as spy, and one as sniper. At the end, the four players with the most wins advanced to a small bracket to be played on the second day.
Continue reading

Want To Be a Better Spy? Be Infamous

In real life, spies benefit from being anonymous. In SpyParty, they benefit from being notorious.

SpyParty is a game with a lot of skill expression. It’s also very difficult—even those at the top level of play will often say that they feel like they aren’t good enough. Both of these things stem from the fact that SpyParty is a multiplayer strategy game. The mechanics of play and counter-play are well documented and explored within the community, and adapting to your opponent is considered a vital skill to victory. If you don’t know what your opponent is doing to beat you, how can you possibly beat them?
Continue reading

Challenger Tournament – Finals

Finals

After nearly four months, the final two Challengers have finished, and the champion of the post-season tournament is #10 seed lazybear, who won 9-6 over #1 seed turnipboy.


Continue reading

Challenger Tournament – Semifinals

Semifinals

And then there were two.

Individual games of SpyParty are mental sprints, but for the players still playing in Challenger, SCL Season 4 has been a marathon. After ten weeks of regular season games and five more in the Challenger tournament, 368 total Challenger matches have been played, and now there’s just one left. The prize is automatic promotion from the chaotic mess and mass of its unforgiving Swiss system, to Iron and possibly beyond.

Our Challenger Tournament finalists are set, and they followed very different paths. Our first finalist is turnipboy, the #1 seed who narrowly missed auto-promotion in the regular season, got a first round bye, and has won all of their four matches by a comfortable 9-4 margin. Their last step to the finals was a 9-4 defeat of plastikqs.

turnipboy’s opponent is the #10 seed, lazybear, who joined in Week 3, did not secure a bye, and narrowly won their first round matchup with walliard, 9-7. But the lazybear that began the tournament is clearly not the one still in it, as he’s scored better margins against better players since then, most notably a 9-5 win against #3 seed sheph just this week.

The final match will be cast this Sunday at 3:00 PM PT on the official SpyParty Twitch channel.

The full Challenger Tournament bracket is available here.

Challenger Tournament – Quarterfinals

Quarterfinals

For the first time in the tournament, all higher seeds won their matchups.

ryoo‘s deep run came to an end after meeting #1 seed turnipboy, who lived up to his seeding with a strong 9-4 victory. All three of his matches have been by that exact margin. He’ll be unlikely to win that comfortably against his next opponent, however: #5 seed plastikqs, who defeated #13 brskaylor 9-6. brskaylor cruised into the quarter-finals without even allowing an opponent to reach four wins before running into one of Challenger’s best.

On the other side of the bracket, sheph defeated davidw 9-4. Before this loss, davidw had yet to even play a close match, winning 9-3 in each of his previous two bouts. sheph, on the other hand, survived a scare in the second round, defeating watermeat just 9-8 before winning definitively in round 3, 9-1.

lazybear (#10) was nominally the favorite over pofke (#34), but the latter was clearly underseeded due to late SCL entry, and was considered the favorite by many, particularly after their 9-1 thumping of monaters in the previous round. But lazybear’s incredible run continued with a comfortable 9-3 victory.

There are just four players left, and only #10 lazybear has made it this far without the aid of a first round bye.

The full Challenger Tournament bracket is available here.

Challenger Tournament – Round 3 Results

Round 3

The favorites demonstrated why they were the favorites in Round 3, with just one lower-seeded player taking the win in the second round: #25 seed ryoo narrowly defeated #9 degran 9-8. And don’t call it an upset, because ryoo was 5-0 in limited SCL play and was probably underseeded as a result.

A similarly underseed pofke scored a definitive 9-1 win over old-timer monaters. brskaylor won 9-2 against paragon12321. #1 seed turnipboy took care of business 9-4 against frostie, and #3 seed sheph did the same against Max Edward Snax. On paper, the closest Round 3 match was #6 davidw against #11 amlabella, but the former won with the same 9-3 margin of last week’s matchup with dbdkmezz.

After hundreds of regular season matches and dozens more in this tournament, we’re down to just eight players fighting for the last two auto-promotions:

Of the top six seeds, four are still alive, and one of the two eliminated simply failed to play their match. Expect the remaining matches to be hard-fought and generally much closer. Everything which rises must converge.

The full Challenger Tournament bracket is available here.